This new river turbine is set to revolutionize electricity generation for households

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Written By Marc Helman

Tackling new challenges with a passion for the environment.

There’s still plenty of water flowing down the river until the world’s green energy transition is complete – and it is precisely this water that a Canadian company now wants to use to generate electricity. 

The company Idénergie produces what it says is an environmentally friendly river turbine that can continuously generate electricity for private households. 

Idénergie, a Canadian renewable energy company, wants to expand its domestic electricity production capabilities. The company has developed a hydrokinetic turbine that can harness hydropower in rivers and convert it into electricity.

Wind turbines can only generate electricity when the wind is blowing. Sunlight is necessary for solar panels to generate electricity.

However, the river turbine with catchy name “Riverlution” will be able to generate electricity continuously – at least as long as the river does not dry up.

The use of tidal turbines has been questioned in the past by environmental groups because the turbines can destroy the habitats of aquatic animals and plants. 

Idénergie says it has paid particular attention to this aspect and has chosen a Darrieus rotor unlikely to harm ecosystems. The rotor is also made of easily recyclable aluminum. The engine does not have a shaft, so water cannot enter the generator, reducing maintenance.

The performance of the river turbine

The performance data of the river turbine sound convincing: at maximum power, a turbine should be able to generate 5,100 kWh of electricity per year or about 14 kWh per day. 

This requires a water flow velocity of 3.5 meters per second or 7 knots. This is also the maximum flow speed up to which the turbine can generate electricity. According to the company, the minimum flow speed is 1 meter per second, in which case the turbine should still be able to generate 900 kWh of electricity per year.

According to the company, a single turbine can produce as much energy as 12 solar panels. It also says that if necessary, the turbine can be adapted to the specific conditions of the water body, allowing it to be installed at shallow depths or in areas where the flow velocity is less than one m/s.

According to the company website, the river turbine costs 12,500 Canadian dollars, the equivalent of about 9,200 euros.

Idénergie, a Canadian renewable energy company, wants to expand its domestic electricity production capabilities. The company has developed a hydrokinetic turbine that can harness hydropower in rivers and convert it into electricity.

Wind turbines can only generate electricity when the wind is blowing. Sunlight is necessary for solar panels to generate electricity.

However, the river turbine with catchy name “Riverlution” will be able to generate electricity continuously – at least as long as the river does not dry up.

The use of tidal turbines has been questioned in the past by environmental groups because the turbines can destroy the habitats of aquatic animals and plants. 

Idénergie says it has paid particular attention to this aspect and has chosen a Darrieus rotor unlikely to harm ecosystems. The rotor is also made of easily recyclable aluminum. The engine does not have a shaft, so water cannot enter the generator, reducing maintenance.

The performance of the river turbine

The performance data of the river turbine sound convincing: at maximum power, a turbine should be able to generate 5,100 kWh of electricity per year or about 14 kWh per day. 

This requires a water flow velocity of 3.5 meters per second or 7 knots. This is also the maximum flow speed up to which the turbine can generate electricity. According to the company, the minimum flow speed is 1 meter per second, in which case the turbine should still be able to generate 900 kWh of electricity per year.

According to the company, a single turbine can produce as much energy as 12 solar panels. It also says that if necessary, the turbine can be adapted to the specific conditions of the water body, allowing it to be installed at shallow depths or in areas where the flow velocity is less than one m/s.

According to the company website, the river turbine costs 12,500 Canadian dollars, the equivalent of about 9,200 euros.